Kynance Cove

Beach facilities

View map of beach Parking available Toilets available South West Coast Path The Lizard National Nature Reserve SSSI National Trust Dog friendly

Season: spring

Consistently among the most viewed beach pages at manonabeach, Kynance Cove is for many people, including interviewee Mark, the quintessential Cornish cove and beach.  Its combination of characterful islands, serpentine-laced caves, a blowing hole and pristine beaches is exquisite.  I frequently encounter visitors experiencing a natural “high” here and it’s intoxicating.  The best time to visit is on an ebb tide, towards low tide, enabling safe scrambling around the nooks and crannies here.  Highly recommended.

Spring visit photo gallery

 

What the beach means to Karen and Mark.

franchis holiday park

 

A bright start to the day at Kynance Cove.

 

A chance to enjoy the blowing hole.

Callestick Farm Cornish Iced Cream

Season: summer

An atmospheric mist hung over Kynance Cove, yet a mild breeze still broke through on this invigorating beach.  The tide was halfway in and the horizon was temptingly opaque, a gateway to the west and beyond.  Beachgoers gazed in wonder out from the beach, including my German interviewees, more used to the beautiful but landlocked Bayerische Alpen in the south of their country.  This beach draws visitors from every corner the world and their enhanced responses are universal.  Highly recommended.

Summer visit photo gallery

 

Visitors from southern Germany enjoy the universal appeal of this beach.

 

und auf deutsch.

 

A wild, misty vista at Kynance Cove.

Season: autumn

The tide had turned back inward at Kynance Cove, but you could still get round to the blowing hole (the bellows), to see the caves and their serpentine.  Grey clouds cloaked the scene, but the rocks framed a tempting horizon, beyond which lay new adventures and acquaintances, new suggestions and implications, new challenges and opportunities.

Autumn visit photo gallery

 

Barbara (Eaton) reflects on the beach as a place to look out from, an inspiration for work.

 

A slightly elevated view, looking down to the beaches at Kynance Cove and out to sea.

Season: summer

What a pleasure it was to be the first person on the beach this morning, at beautiful Kynance Cove.  As the tide turned inward, my footsteps were washed away and the beach assumed another guise, as it has done throughout time.  Recent storms have scoured the sand from the top of the beach, but the elements will conspire to replace it just as quickly.  Like Treen Cove and Rinsey Cove, you need to time your visit to coincide with a low tide for the best beach access, although you can get to the cafe at all times.

Summer visit photo gallery

 

Vicky’s ongoing relationship with the beach and Kynance Cove, for all her family.

 

Jorg and Regula explain their yearning to be near the sea.

 

In awe of the relentless sea, round by the bellows at Kynance Cove.

 

The beach at Kynance Cove, on an early morning visit to catch the low tide.

Season: winter

I went down early to Kynance Cove to catch the tide halfway in, so I could watch the waves against the rocks.  Later, I returned to interview Arthur on the rocky slopes down to the beach, then chat to Gail at low tide by the blow hole (the bellows) on the beach.  This is the most photographed beach in Cornwall and never fails to impress.  You feel like you’re in another world down on the sand and your mind can fly away, if you let it.  Highly recommended, a very special place.

Winter visit photo

 

My chat with Gail, on the waterline at Kynance Cove in February.

 

Talking with Arthur of Rock Works, a company securing the rocky side of the pathway down to Kynance Cove in Cornwall.  Watch the guy in the white hat.

 

The waves and rocks at Kynance Cove on a half tide, from just above the sea.

Season: autumn

This is a must-visit beach, probably the most outstanding in the county, visually, at low tide.  It has everything, rolling breakers, sea stacks, caves lined with serpentine, fine sand, a blow hole and a theatrical setting, when viewed from above on the walk down.  Check tide times before your visit, to catch it at low tide.  There is an excellent café in the cove with facilities and toilets, but access requires a degree of energy from the detached car park, well worth the effort.  I always seem to meet interesting people at Kynance Cove.

 

A chat with Heather and Rachel.

 

Chatting with Kelly McMahon, at Kynance Cove, descended from the first McMahon in Australia.

 

The blowing hole, called the bellows, at Kynance Cove.

 

Serpentine, in the caves at Kynance Cove.

 

Kynance Cove, from a precarious spot on a ridge overlooking the beach.

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